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Posts Tagged ‘Supernatural’

INSIDIOUS

April 3, 2011 1 comment

4 / 5

Out with gore and in with the eerie side of horror. Jame’s Wan’s “Insidious” makes a big statement in the genre; a message of sorts to current and future horror writers and directors that excessive, and often unnecessary, gore isn’t the formula for creating a great horror movie. Often you’ll find yourself scratching the top part of your eye — not because it’s itchy but for the convenience of having your hand close by to cover your face during one of the many surprise moments in the film. Wan has a way of scaring the audience with just the simplest camera movement and it compliments nicely even moments completely absent of horror. If your eyes were closed most of the time the music will be a difficult thing to forget as it’s just as frightening, if not more, than the movie itself.

Roger Ebert’s Review: http://rogerebert.suntimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20110331/REVIEWS/110339994

THE RITE

February 6, 2011 1 comment

1 / 5

Only people with attention disorders could possibly see past the fact that this movie goes nowhere at a relatively quick rate. The Rite, besides falling extremely short of being considered a good movie in any possible way, created a sizeable rift in the stretch of well-executed exorcist films. Though some may feel differently about the “Exorcism of Emily Rose” approach, or the controversial success of “The Last Exorcism,” they were strong in their originality and didn’t unanimously create argument over the sub-genre wearing thin. The set up seemed like it could be promising up until an ever-lasting flat-line where the movie starts to become relentlessly repetitive.

THE HOUSE OF THE DEVIL

January 10, 2011 Leave a comment

 4 / 5

A stylistically directed film — mixed with convincing period-oriented wardrobe and props that make the film feel like more of a horror movie from the 1980’s — a time when horror movies were significantly more suggestive in their horrors than the much too frequent over-the-top approach that has plagued so many films of late. The film also maintains a steady, lingering sense of eeriness throughout its’ 90-minute run time that satisfyingly escalates through the films climactic conclusion; a conclusion which, fortunately, isn’t easy to see coming. While John Carpenter showed us what Michael Meyers was capable of doing to babysitters, writer/director Ti West approaches the challenge with confidence when Samantha, a local college student, answers an ad for a babysitter.