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Posts Tagged ‘Horror’

SCREAM 4

April 17, 2011 2 comments

2 / 5

Wes Craven’s recent horror movies have made one thing perfectly clear: he needs to win fans back, and soon. What started off as exciting quickly took the route of disappointing, relying too heavily on nostalgia than exploring any new and interesting territory. The Franchise’s biggest draw is the audience’s development of a list of suspects and, as the movie progresses, the narrowing of your list makes it perfectly clear that the pay-off will be as terrible as the film’s being branded a re-boot.  My Soul to Take and now Scream 4 have certainly set Craven back a few steps and sends the message that perhaps the veteran horror director is losing steam.

INSIDIOUS

April 3, 2011 1 comment

4 / 5

Out with gore and in with the eerie side of horror. Jame’s Wan’s “Insidious” makes a big statement in the genre; a message of sorts to current and future horror writers and directors that excessive, and often unnecessary, gore isn’t the formula for creating a great horror movie. Often you’ll find yourself scratching the top part of your eye — not because it’s itchy but for the convenience of having your hand close by to cover your face during one of the many surprise moments in the film. Wan has a way of scaring the audience with just the simplest camera movement and it compliments nicely even moments completely absent of horror. If your eyes were closed most of the time the music will be a difficult thing to forget as it’s just as frightening, if not more, than the movie itself.

Roger Ebert’s Review: http://rogerebert.suntimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20110331/REVIEWS/110339994

THE RITE

February 6, 2011 1 comment

1 / 5

Only people with attention disorders could possibly see past the fact that this movie goes nowhere at a relatively quick rate. The Rite, besides falling extremely short of being considered a good movie in any possible way, created a sizeable rift in the stretch of well-executed exorcist films. Though some may feel differently about the “Exorcism of Emily Rose” approach, or the controversial success of “The Last Exorcism,” they were strong in their originality and didn’t unanimously create argument over the sub-genre wearing thin. The set up seemed like it could be promising up until an ever-lasting flat-line where the movie starts to become relentlessly repetitive.

THE LAST EXORCISM

January 20, 2011 1 comment

3 / 5

The Last Exorcism does more than just satisfy through a series of thrills and periodic blood-spatterings. A film whose most important character is almost without question the region of Louisiana in which the events take place, The Last Exorcism also offers a satisfying glimpse into the world of show-man priests; priests who are simply doing that and that alone, putting on a show.  The act of exorcising demons and evil spirits certainly isn’t new to the horror movie genre and the Last Exorcism provides some interesting and original insight into the exorcism practice without being the first to spoil the streak of well-executed approaches.

THE HOUSE OF THE DEVIL

January 10, 2011 Leave a comment

 4 / 5

A stylistically directed film — mixed with convincing period-oriented wardrobe and props that make the film feel like more of a horror movie from the 1980’s — a time when horror movies were significantly more suggestive in their horrors than the much too frequent over-the-top approach that has plagued so many films of late. The film also maintains a steady, lingering sense of eeriness throughout its’ 90-minute run time that satisfyingly escalates through the films climactic conclusion; a conclusion which, fortunately, isn’t easy to see coming. While John Carpenter showed us what Michael Meyers was capable of doing to babysitters, writer/director Ti West approaches the challenge with confidence when Samantha, a local college student, answers an ad for a babysitter.

RESIDENT EVIL 5

July 12, 2010 5 comments

6.5 / 10

For a game that bares the ending to one of the most popular and succesful video game franchises, it comes with great disappointment to recommend that it may be more satisfying to READ about Resident Evil 5 rather than play it. How many times exactly will this virus mutate? With these repeated mutations comes frighteningly difficult and unsatisfying changes to the Resident Evil games you’re most familiar with playing; changes that were executed fairly well in RE4, and blown ridiculously out of proportion in RE5.

The minute you come into contact with a room full of zombies unloading machine gun rounds in your direction is likely when you’ll ask yourself if this is REALLY a Resident Evil Game you’re playing. The Nemesis was one thing, but the evolution and abilities of these zombies in RE5 should have been equally complimented by a more manageable and smoother gameplay system whether it broke the traditional mechanics of Resident Evil or not.  The introduction of “Los Ganados” was an effective twist in the series, and it is partly, among other things of course, what collected such acclaim for Resident Evil 4. Resident Evil 5 introduces Majini’s; These new enemies (they shouldnt even be called zombies at this point) have improved jumping ability, and overall dominant physical capabilities, which frustratingly renders the Resident Evil engine meaningless.

While running may SEEM like it’s helpful it really isn’t. You’ll find yourself often running to safety, either because of an overwhelming battle with these new holycrapninjasuperzombies, or allowing yourself just enough time to change your weapon or use a health. Yes, RE5 does NOT allow you to change weapons in your pause menu inventory so prepare to find yourself immersed in a sea of enemies more frequently than you would like, HOPING you’ll change your weapon or click your health spray in time (good luck). Ammunition is as scarce as you remember, you’ll expectedly find yourself at parts where the knife is your only friend, and an unreliable one at that. It’s difficult to conserve ammo when it takes so damn much of it to kill these new zombies so be sure to equip your partner with plenty of extra to cover you in a tight situation.

The ever-expanding scope of Resident Evil has lost its appeal; it was more interesting and horror-filled when we were creeping down the halls of the Arklay Mansion, or wearily crossing the zombie ridden streets of Racoon City. Resident Evil 5 follows Sheva Alomar and Resident Evil veteran Chris Redfield in their tracing the trail of a biological weapons deal which, to Chris’ surprise, involves the likes of Albert Wesker who was believed to be dead. All in all it was an unecessary story to tell. Bringing Wesker back after the events in RE4  foiled a more satisfying conclusion than you’re provided with in 5, AND its a much better game. If you like Resident Evil as much as I do then you’ll be dissatisfied to experience how far RE5 strays from the roots of Resident Evil.

 

SPLICE

June 13, 2010 Leave a comment


3 / 5

Movie genre’s are no longer as cut and dry as they used to be. There certainly was a time where a horror movie was a horror movie and that was that. Instead we see an influx of films in recent years that begin to bend and complicate the categorization of genre; in this case, SPLICE, among others of course, lend themselves to that argument. Besides the distorted sense of genre the acting was overall pretty forgettable, but is part of a bright, and respectably original concept. Overall it was an original concept with moderate execution. Despite the aforementioned genre distortion you’ll notice a lot of thematic depth for a movie that may seem like a standard horror movie on the surface. While the concept may intrigue you, it will be difficult to ignore the fact that this movie leads you where you are aren’t expecting to be led at all.